SfB Server 2015: Cannot install Cumulative Update – Failed to create network share. (-2147467259 xds-replica)

In a recent support case we couldn’t install the Skype for Business Server 2015 Cumulative Update on a Edge Server:

We checked the Skype for Business Core Components log file (OcsCore.msp-EDGESTD-[2017-03-21][15-30-48]_log.txt) located in %TEMP%:

The log showed that the Setup was aborted because it couldn’t create a file share:

CreateSmb: Error 0x80004005: failed to create share: ‘xds-replica’
MSI (s) (78!14) [15:32:19:981]: Product: Skype for Business Server 2015, Core Components — Error 26301. Failed to create network share. (-2147467259 xds-replica)

MSI (s) (78!14) [15:32:19:981]: Closing MSIHANDLE (193) of type 790531 for thread 3860
Error 26301. Failed to create network share. (-2147467259 xds-replica)

After checking the services running on the server we notice that Server Service (LanmanServer) was disabled:

Then we enable and started the service:

With Server Service running we were able to install the Skype for Business Cumulative Update:

Please note that if we try to repair the Skype for Business Server 2015 Core Components when the Server Service is disable we also get the following errors:

Failed to create network share. (-2147467259 xds-replica)

Failed to drop network share. (-2147022782 xds-replica)

Lync/SfB Edge Server on a single subnet

The point of this post is to help those that can’t have 2 NIC on 2 separated not routable subnets. I have already encountered some customers whose security team stated that it was technically impossible to deploy an additional subnet on their current security/network infrastructure.

Many of you know that Lync Edge Requirements have the following statement:

The internal and external subnets must not be routable to each other.
In http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg412847.aspx

To meet this requirement we need two subnets on our DMZ, as showed in the following example:

EdgeSN01

Since we can only have one default gateway, the routes to the internal address should look like this:

route ADD 10.0.0.0 MASK 255.255.255.0 172.20.0.254 METRIC 1
route ADD 10.1.0.0 MASK 255.255.255.0 172.20.0.254 METRIC 1
route ADD 10.2.0.0 MASK 255.255.255.0 172.20.0.254 METRIC 1

What about those deployments that only have one subnet for the Lync Edge Network Interfaces?

EdgeSN02

In this example, we have 2 interfaces with the same gateway. It’s common to create a route as in the previous example — although this can work in some cases, what can happen is that Lync Edge will use External NIC to reach internal address.
Firewall will block all communications from the external NIC to internal address. Also, Lync Front End isn’t expecting External NIC to reach it.
The workaround is to specify how Lync Edge NIC should be used to reach internal address. This can be achieved by following 2 simple steps:

Step 1 – Find Edge Internal interface number

Command Prompt

First we need to know the internal interface name:

ipconfig /all

EdgeSN03
Note: We already know that 172.16.0.30 is the internal interface IP address.

After getting the interface name, let’s get the Interface Index — 15 in this case:

route print -4

EdgeSN04

PowerShell (only in Windows Server 2012/2012R2)

The following Cmdlet — which is only available on Windows 8/8.1, Server 2012/2012R2 — displays the Interface Index more quickly than the Command Prompt method.

Get-NetIPAddress -AddressFamily IPv4 | Select ifIndex,IPAddress | ft -Autosize

EdgeSN05

Step 2 – Create the proper routes in the IP routing table

Now all we need to do is create the routes that specify the Interface Index:

Command Prompt

route ADD 10.0.0.0 MASK 255.255.255.0 172.16.0.254 METRIC 1 IF 15 -p
route ADD 10.1.0.0 MASK 255.255.255.0 172.16.0.254 METRIC 1 IF 15 -p
route ADD 10.2.0.0 MASK 255.255.255.0 172.16.0.254 METRIC 1 IF 15 -p

EdgeSN06

PowerShell (only in Windows Server 2012/2012R2)

New-NetRoute -AddressFamily IPv4 -DestinationPrefix “10.0.0.0/24” -NextHop 172.16.0.254 -RouteMetric 1 -ifIndex 15
New-NetRoute -AddressFamily IPv4 -DestinationPrefix “10.1.0.0/24” -NextHop 172.16.0.254 -RouteMetric 1 -ifIndex 15
New-NetRoute -AddressFamily IPv4 -DestinationPrefix “10.2.0.0/24” -NextHop 172.16.0.254 -RouteMetric 1 -ifIndex 15

EdgeSN07

After these changes, the Lync Edge will use internal NIC for all communications to the Front End(s) and Clients. Do remember this workaround should only be used if you can’t have 2 not routable subnets on Lync Edge Server.
TIP: If you want, you can create routes to all possible internal addresses, as long as your company follows what is described in RFC1918 regarding private IP address:

Command Prompt

route ADD 10.0.0.0 MASK 255.0.0.0 172.16.0.254 METRIC 1 IF 15 -p
route ADD 172.16.0.0 MASK 255.240.0.0 172.16.0.254 METRIC 1 IF 15 -p
route ADD 192.168.0.0 MASK 255.255.0.0 172.16.0.254 METRIC 1 IF 15 -p

PowerShell (only in Windows Server 2012/2012R2)

New-NetRoute -AddressFamily IPv4 -DestinationPrefix “10.0.0.0/8” -NextHop 172.16.0.254 -RouteMetric 1 -ifIndex 15
New-NetRoute -AddressFamily IPv4 -DestinationPrefix “172.16.0.0/12” -NextHop 172.16.0.254 -RouteMetric 1 -ifIndex 15
New-NetRoute -AddressFamily IPv4 -DestinationPrefix “192.168.0.0/16” -NextHop 172.16.0.254 -RouteMetric 1 -ifIndex 15